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Natural Health Glossary
Medical Terms, Therapies, Accreditation

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Cerebrovascular accident (stroke)
A sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brain. Depending on the part of the brain affected, a stroke can cause a person to lose the ability to speak or move a part of the body such as an arm or a leg. Stroke is the secon   (more info - Cerebrovascular accident)

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Dietary supplement (supplement)
To add as a supplement to what seems insufficient, e.g. "supplement your diet"; to serve as a supplement to e.g. "Vitamins supplemented his meager diet". Nutritionally, dietary supplements refer to a substance such as a vitamin pill, fiber solution, or herbal extract that is consumed in addition    (more info - Dietary supplement)

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Forest bathing (shinrin-yoku)
Also called "forest medicine", forest bathing involves a short, leisurely visit to a forest and is regarded as being similar to natural aromatherapy. It has become a recognized relaxation and/or stress management activity in Japan. The trip is designed for relaxation and recreation while breathin   (more info - Forest bathing)

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High-intensity interval training (sprint interval training)
An enhanced form of interval training, an exercise strategy alternating periods of short intense anaerobic exercise with less-intense recovery periods. HIIT is a form of cardiovascular exercise. Usual HIIT sessions may vary from 4-30 minutes. These short, intense workouts provide improved athleti   (more info - High-intensity interval training)

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microgreens (sprouts)
Sprout: To shoot, as the seed of a plant; to germinate; to push out new shoots; hence, to grow like shoots of plants. The newly grown bud (especially from a germinating seed) of a plant. Microgreens (micro greens) are a tiny form of young edible greens produced from various kinds of vegetables,   (more info - microgreens)

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Resistance training (strength training)
Physical training that utilizes isometric (muscle contraction without movement at the joint), isotonic (of two or more muscles having equal tension -- muscular work which produces motion of a body part), or isokinetic (with a specialized apparatus that provides variable resistance to a movement) exe   (more info - Resistance training)

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Salicylic acid
A white crystalline substance with a bitter aftertaste; used as a fungicide or in making aspirin or dyes or perfumes. The name originates from Latin word salix, meaning "willow tree", from the bark of which the substance used to be obtained. This colorless crystalline organic acid is widely used    (more info - Salicylic acid)

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salmonella
* Salmonella is a bacteria found in the intestines of animals. Foods or environments contaminated with animal waste may contain Salmonella bacteria. It has also been found in a low percentage of unbroken raw eggs. * Raw poultry is the most common food that may contain Salmonella. Other food   (more info - salmonella)

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Salt
White crystalline form of especially sodium chloride used to season and preserve food;One of the four basic taste sensations; like the taste of sea water;To preserve with salt, as of meats; to add salt to. In chemistry, salts are ionic compounds that result from the neutralization reaction of an    (more info - Salt)

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salve
semisolid preparation (usually containing a medicine) applied externally as a remedy or for soothing an irritation   (more info - salve)

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saponification (soap)
A form of hydrolysis where an alkali is added to an oil to change it into a solid (soap).   (more info - saponification)

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Sarcopenia
Loss of muscle tissue as a natural part of the aging process, which inevitably results in frailty. Sarcopenia is often found together with osteoporosis, a loss of bone that is similarly associated with the aging process. The average person experiences 0.5-1% loss per year after the age of 25.    (more info - Sarcopenia)

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satiation (satiety)
The feeling or state of being sated; being satisfactorily full and unable to take on more. The satiety center in animals are located in ventromedial nucleus of hypothalamus.

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saturated fatty acids (saturated fats)
Fat that is found in foods from animal meats and skin, dairy products, and some vegetables. A fat that contains no carbon-carbon double bonds. They have high melting points. At room temperature Saturated fats are usually solid, and generally found in animal products, like beef, poulty, whole milk,   (more info - saturated fatty acids)

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scar
a mark left (usually on the skin) by the healing of injured tissue

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schizophrenia
Any of several psychotic disorders characterized by distortions of reality and disturbances of thought and language and withdrawal from social contact. Schizophrenia is the most common form of psychosis, characterized by loss of intellectual and emotional function, including:thought: misinterpretati   (more info - schizophrenia)

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sciatica
Sciatica is low back pain radiating down the buttock and below the knee. Traditionally defined as pain (neuralgia) in the sciatic nerve (which arises from the sacral plexus and passes about halfway down the thigh where it divides into the common peroneal and tibial nerves), or its branches, that is   (more info - sciatica)

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Seasonal Affective Disorder (sad)
A form of depression (biochemical imbalance) typically coinciding with the decrease in daylight hours, but for some people, occurring in the summer months. It is marked by a drop in serotonin, the cause of which is a matter of some dispute. Classic, or winter Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is    (more info - Seasonal Affective Disorder)

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sedative
1. [noun] An agent that reduces excitability or anxiety and calms a person; a remedy which allays irritability and irritation, and irritative activity or pain. 2. [adj] tending to soothe or tranquilize; "valerian has a tranquilizing effect"; "took a hot drink with sedative properties before going    (more info - sedative)

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sedentary lifestyle (sedentary living)
A sedentary lifestyle is a type of lifestyle with no or irregular physical activity. Sedentary activities include sitting, reading, watching television, playing video games, and computer use for much of the day with little or no vigorous physical activity. A lack of physical activity is one of th   (more info - sedentary lifestyle)

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selenium
Selenium is a nonmetallic element related to sulfur and tellurium that functions as an antioxidant and an essential dietary mineral. It can be found in nuts, cereals, meat, mushrooms, fish, and eggs. Brazil nuts are the richest ordinary dietary source (though this is soil-dependent, since the Bra   (more info - selenium)

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self esteem (self-esteem)
A feeling of pride in yourself; a good opinion of one's self; self-complacency.; the quality of being worthy of esteem or respect. Self-esteem is a term used in psychology to reflect a person's overall emotional evaluation of his or her own worth. It is a judgment of oneself as well as an attitud   (more info - self esteem)

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Sepsis (septicemia)
Sepsis: The presence of pus-forming bacteria, pathogenic fungi, or their toxins in the blood or tissues, profoundly affecting the patient's blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature. Septicemia: Invasion of the bloodstream by virulent microorganisms from a focus of infection; also known as   (more info - Sepsis)

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serotonin
A neurotransmitter (hormone) found in the intestines and in the brain, where it is involved in processes such as sleep, memory, and depression, as well as other neurological functions. Serotonin is a hormone, also called 5-hydroxytryptamine, which has the chemical formula C10H12N2O. It is produce   (more info - serotonin)

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sesquiterpenes
Common in higher plants, Sesquiterpenes are hydrocarbons (terpenes) with 15 carbon atoms. They are actually naturally occurring alcohols that very rarely exist in as volatile oils (able to evaporate at low temperatures). When distilled from the plant matter, these compounds stimulate glands and th   (more info - sesquiterpenes)

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Shamanic singing (shamanic sound healing)
Shamanic-style sound healing is about energetically connecting to the whole, that which is larger than the individual listeners. Depending on the context, that can mean the spirit realm or simply the sense of community. There is typically a ritualistic component to Shamanic sound healing, it may    (more info - Shamanic singing)

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shiatsu
An Eastern therapy of physical and energy rebalance. In the Traditional technique, pressure with thumbs, fingers and palms applied to determined areas and points of the human body (the same points of the body as in acupuncture), without the use of any mechanical or of another type instrument, correc   (more info - shiatsu)

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Shift work
Shift work is an employment practice designed to make use of, or provide service across, all 24 hours of the clock each day of the week. Shift work is considered a risk factor for many health problems. It has many negative cognitive effects (e.g., learning and memory deficits, loss of attention a   (more info - Shift work)

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Shift work sleep disorder (swsd)
A circadian rhythm sleep disorder characterized by insomnia and excessive sleepiness affecting people whose work hours overlap with the typical sleep period. There are numerous shift work schedules, and they may be permanent, intermittent, or rotating; consequently, the manifestations of SWSD are qu   (more info - Shift work sleep disorder)

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Sialagogue
Stimulates the secretion of saliva from the salivary glands.

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Singing bowls (rin gongs)
Singing bowls, sometimes called "meditation bowls" or "rin gongs", are technically a form of bell, though inverted and resting rather than suspended. According to researcher Joseph Feinstein, singing bowls were traditionally used in Asia and the tradition of making sound with bronze bowls could go b   (more info - Singing bowls)

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sirtuin
A class of proteins that possess either mono-ribosyltransferase, or deacylase activity. Sirtuins regulate important biological pathways in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. Sirtuins have been implicated in influencing a wide range of cellular processes like aging, transcription, apoptosis, infla   (more info - sirtuin)

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skin conductance
A change in the electrical resistance of the skin (the ability of the skin to conduct electricity), associated with sympathetic nervous system discharge caused by an emotional stimulus, such as fright.

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Sleep
A natural and periodic state of rest during which consciousness of the world is suspended. Sleep is attended by a relaxation of the muscles, and the absence of voluntary activity for any rational objects or purpose. The pulse is slower, the respiratory movements fewer in number but more profound,   (more info - Sleep)

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sleep apnoea (sleep apnea)
Apnea -- transient cessation of breathing -- that occurs during sleep. It is a sleep disorder characterized by abnormal pauses in breathing or instances of abnormally low breathing during sleep. Each pause in breathing (the apnea) can last from at least ten seconds to minutes, and may occur 5 to   (more info - sleep apnoea)

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sleeplessness (insomnia)
The inability to fall asleep or to stay asleep as long as desired. Insomnia is chronic sleeplessness, a sleep disorder characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or nonrestorative sleep (sleep of poor quality). It is most often thought of as both a sign and a symptom that can ac   (more info - sleeplessness)

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smectite
A type of clay mineral (e.g., montmorillonite) that has a relatively open structure and undergoes reversible expansion on absorbing water.

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Smoking
The act of smoking tobacco or other substances; a hot vapor containing fine particles of carbon being produced by combustion; emitting smoke in great volume. Smoking is a practice in which a substance is burned and the resulting smoke breathed in to be tasted or inhaled. Most commonly the substan   (more info - Smoking)

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sodium
A silvery soft waxy metallic element of the alkali metal group; occurs abundantly in natural compounds (especially in salt water); burns with a yellow flame and reacts violently in water; occurs in sea water and in the mineral halite (rock salt). It is an essential mineral in maintaining the fluid b   (more info - sodium)

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Somatic dysfunction
The impaired or altered function of related components of the somatic (bodywork) system including: the skeletal, arthrodial, and myofascial structures, and their related vascular, lymphatic, and neural elements. Somatic dysfunction may be evaluated and treated by osteopaths or osteopathic physicians   (more info - Somatic dysfunction)

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somatoemotional release
A craniosacral therapy technique which deals with the physical manifestations of emotional trauma - which can be caused by accident, injury, or emotional stress. The manipulation and release of the physical block will often cause an emotional energy outburst; somatoemotional release is the controll   (more info - somatoemotional release)

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Somatoform disorder
In psychiatry and psychology, somatoform disorders are a group of mental disorderd characterized by symptoms that suggest physical illness or injury -- symptoms that cannot be explained fully by a general medical condition or by the direct effect of a substance, and are not attributable to another m   (more info - Somatoform disorder)

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Somatosensory system
Senses of proprioception and kinesthesia of joints:information from skin and joints(pressure and vibratory senses); spatial position and movement relative to the support surface; movement and position of different body parts relative to each other It is made up of a number of different receptors,   (more info - Somatosensory system)

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sound healing (sound therapy)
Sound therapy can be a form of vibrational therapy, or a brain-training technique that uses sound - including singing, played music, white noise, and other auditory effects - to create shifts in physical, mental, and emotional conditions. Sound therapy or sound healing is a category of tools and    (more info - sound healing)

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spasticity
the quality of moving or acting in spasms

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spinocerebellar disorder
any of several congenital disorders marked by degeneration of the cerebellum and spinal cord resulting in spasticity and ataxia.

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spondylarthritis (spondylitis)
Arthritis that affects one or more of the intervertebral joints in the spine.Inflammation of a spinal joint with variable involvement of peripheral joints and nonarticular structures; characterized by pain and stiffness. Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic form of spondylitis (arthritis) primaril   (more info - spondylarthritis)

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Sports Taping (sports strapping)
Strapping is the process of applying a strap to an item to combine, hold, reinforce, or fasten it. It is used in packaging as well as in physiotherapy, where the strapping involves leveraging one body part to reduce wear on another and to stabilize the affected area. On the human body, strapping    (more info - Sports Taping)

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starch
A complex carbohydrate (polysaccharide) found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper and textiles. Edible starches are br   (more info - starch)

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stearic acid
A waxy saturated fatty acid; occurs widely as a glyceride in animal and vegetable fats. It is a source of tallow, that was traditionally used in candle-making and soaps. Stearic acid is now mainly used in the production of detergents, soaps, and cosmetics such as shampoos and shaving cream produc   (more info - stearic acid)

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stearidonic acid (sda)
An omega-3 fatty acid, sometimes called moroctic acid. It is biosynthesized from alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) by the enzyme delta-6-desaturase. Natural sources of this fatty acid are the seed oils of hemp, blackcurrant, corn gromwell, and echium, and the cyanobacterium Spirulina.   (more info - stearidonic acid)

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steatohepatitis (fatty liver)
Yellow discoloration as a result of the accumulation of certain fats (triglycerides) in the liver; can be caused by alcoholic cirrhosis or pregnancy or exposure to certain toxins. FLD is a reversible condition where large vacuoles of triglyceride fat accumulate in liver cells via the process of ste   (more info - steatohepatitis)

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steatorrhea
The presence of excess fat in feces. Stools may also float due to excess lipid, have an oily appearance and be especially foul-smelling. An oily anal leakage or some level of fecal incontinence may occur.

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Stem cells
An undifferentiated biological cell found in multicellular organisms that can replicate indefinitely and can differentiate into other specialized cells; stem cells serve as a continuous source of new cells by dividing (through mitosis) to produce more stem cells. Specifically, this refers to the sel   (more info - Stem cells)

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steroid
1. Any hormone affecting the development and growth of sex organs. 2. Any of several fat-soluble organic compounds having as a basis 17 carbon atoms in four rings; many have important physiological effects. Common steroids include: estrogen, testosterone, cortisone, vitamin d, cholesterol.   (more info - steroid)

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stimulant
1. That which stimulates, provokes, or excites. 2. An agent which produces a temporary increase of vital activity in the organism, or in any of its parts; -- sometimes used without qualification to signify an alcoholic beverage used as a stimulant.

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Strain/Counter Strain Therapy
An osteopathic technique which changes the interaction between dysfunctional vertebrae and reduces fascial tension and restores joint mobility.

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Stress
1. (Physics) A force that produces strain on a physical body; "the intensity of stress is expressed in units of force divided by units of area". 2. (Psychology) A state of mental or emotional strain or suspense; "he suffered from fatigue and emotional tension"; "stress is a vasoconstrictor"; 3   (more info - Stress)

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stress reduction (stress management)
This is a broad category of options/treatments that range from counseling and life coaching, to massage therapy and remedies (homeopathic, naturopathic, herbal).

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Structural Integration
A system of hands-on connective tissue manipulation and movement education aimed at releasing stress patterns, and helping the client move and function with greater freedom, and effortlessly maintain a more upright posture

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sublingual administration
Translated as "under the tongue," sublingual administration is exactly that, treatments and remedies that are taken by placing them under the tongue to be dissolved and then absorbed through the mucous membrane.    (more info - sublingual administration)

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substance abuse (addiction)
A patterned use of some substance resulting in the state of being physically or psychologically dependent; being abnormally tolerant to and dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming (especially alcohol or narcotic drugs). The user consumes the substance in amounts   (more info - substance abuse)

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sucrose (table sugar)
1. A water-soluble disaccharide which is used as our everyday table sugar. It is produced by most plants but is most commonly extracted from sugarcane and sugar beets. 2. A form of sugar that the body must break down into a more simple form before the blood can absorb it and take it to the cells.   (more info - sucrose)

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sudorific (sudorific )
Causing sweat; as, sudorific herbs.

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sugar
1. A class of carbohydrates that taste sweet. Typically, a white crystalline (when refined; brown or golden when unrefined) carbohydrate used as a sweetener and preservative; 2. An essential structural component of living cells and source of energy for animals; includes simple sugars with small    (more info - sugar)

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sulfites (sulphites)
A salt of sulphurous acid. Sulphites are sometimes added to foods as a preservative, particularly wines - where they also occur naturally. They are used to prevent oxidation and colour change, which also explains their use in dried fruit and vegetables. A certain segment of the population will   (more info - sulfites)

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sulforaphane
A phytochemical that exhibits anticancer, antidiabetic, and antimicrobial properties in experimental models. Sulforaphane is obtained from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts or cabbages. The enzyme myrosinase transforms glucoraphanin, a glucosinolate, into sulforaphane upon   (more info - sulforaphane)

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sulphur
An abundant tasteless odorless multivalent nonmetallic element; best known in yellow crystals; occurs in many sulphide and sulphate minerals and even in native form (especially in volcanic regions); to treat with sulphur in order to preserve, e.g. "These dried fruits are sulphured." Sulfur is an    (more info - sulphur)

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Superfood
A naturally nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being. Those nutrients may include: minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, other phytonutrients, and zoonutrients, while remaining low in properties considered to be negative, such as being high in saturated fats o   (more info - Superfood)

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sustained attention
The ability to maintain consistent attention during a continuous and repetitive activity such as driving on an interstate freeway for long periods of time. The capacity to sustain attention at an efficient level noticeably deteriorates over time when performing tasks that involve discrimination and/   (more info - sustained attention)

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Sutra Neti
Neti is a component of the full Yogic (see yoga) system. It entails cleansing the nasal passages to allow better breathing and breathwork. Sutra Neti is a more advanced form of nasal cleansing involving the pouring of saline water through one nostril and out the other, accompanied by the insertio   (more info - Sutra Neti)

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Sweat (perspiration)
Salty fluid excreted from the sweat glands of the skin as part of the homeostatic process; the exocrine process of the sweat glands of the skin secreting a salty fluid. Sweating allows the body to regulate its temperature. (Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating, usually secondary to an underlying cond   (more info - Sweat)

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Swedish Massage
Manipulation of the soft tissues of the body, including skin, muscles, ligaments, tendons, and fascia. Most often performed with oil. Techniques include stroking, vibrations, shaking, effleurage (light long strokes), petrissage (circular manipulation), tapotement (percussive techniqes) and rocking.   (more info - Swedish Massage)

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Swine flu (h1n1)
Swine influenza virus (SIV) is any strain of the influenza family of viruses that is endemic in pigs. As of 2009, the known SIV strains include influenza C and the subtypes of influenza A known as H1N1, H1N2, H3N1, H3N2, and H2N3.   (more info - Swine flu)

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Swiss ball (balance ball)
Also known as: pilates ball, exercise ball, physio ball, and body ball. They are constructed of elastic soft PVC with a typical diameter between 35 to 85 centimeters (14 to 34 inches) and filled with air. The air pressure is changed by removing a valve stem and either filling with air or letting    (more info - Swiss ball)

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Sympathetic nervous system
One of two main divisions of the autonomic nervous system, the other being the parasympathetic nervous system. Originating in the thoracic regions of the spinal cord, this system controls physiologic arousal and increases such parameters as blood pressure and heart rate, decreases digestive secretio   (more info - Sympathetic nervous system)

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Syncope (fainting)
Spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood supply to the entire brain, usually from low blood pressure. Also known as fainting, passing out, and swooning, is defined as a short loss of consciousness and muscle strength, characterized by a fast onset, short duration, and spontaneo   (more info - Syncope)

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synovium
A thin membrane in synovial (freely moving) joints that lines the point capsule and secretes synovial fluid. Synovial joints include: knuckle, mandibular joint (jaw), and knee.

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