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Herbology 101 - Herbal Remedies and Herb Information

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Elder (Sambucus nigra)
The elder tree has been part of human medicinal and spiritual lore dating back many centuries. Medicinally, flowers, bark, berries (see elderberry) are used - though care must be used as raw leaves, twigs, branches, seeds and roots contain cyanide-inducing glycoside. Unripe berries are mildly toxic. Extracts from stembark, leaves, flowers, fruits, root are used to treat bronchitis, cough, upper respiratory cold infections, fever. A small (N=60) double blind clinical trial published in 2004 sh
WARNING: Do not ingest the twigs, branches, leaves, seeds or roots as they contain a glycoside that becomes cyanide as the body processes it.
- Due to the possibility of cyanide poisoning, children should be discouraged from making whistles, slingshots or other toys from elderberry wood.
- The bark contains calcium oxalate crystals, which are a major constituent of human kidney stones.
- In ingesting the florets or teas and other remedies made from the flowers, there is always the potential of triggering pollen allergies.

... click here to view full herb profile
Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)
Elderberries are berrylike drupes of the elder tree. They are high in antioxidants, particularly vitamin C, anthocyanins (anthocyanin glucosides), and the phenolic compounds quercetin and kaempferol. The dark blue, purple, or sometimes deep red berries can be eaten when fully ripe but are mildly poisonous in their unripe state (see warnings below). The berries are edible after cooking and can be used to make jams, jellies, syrups, wine, and chutneys. Medicinally, elderberry syrup has been
WARNING: While ripe berries are perfectly safe to eat, but do not ingest the seeds, or any raw components of the rest of the tree.
Due to the possibility of cyanide poisoning, children should be discouraged from making whistles, slingshots or other toys from elderberry wood.

... click here to view full herb profile


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Disclaimer: This content is provided here for informational purposes only. Do not attempt to self-diagnose or treat. Check with a qualified Health Practitioner before using any herbal treatment. Use of these reference pages signifies acceptance of this notice and our Terms and Condition.

Information on this website is for information purposes only.
Please consult a qualified health practitioner before taking any course of action.
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